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Luxembourg Tax Ruling Quartered Amazon's Tax Bill: EU Commission, by Ulrika Lomas, Tax-News.com, Brussels
Wednesday, October 4, 2017

The European Commission has concluded that a tax ruling issued by Luxembourg in 2003, and prolonged in 2011, lowered the tax paid by Amazon in the country without any valid justification, and ordered the Government to recover around EUR250m (USD295m) in unpaid taxes from the retail behemoth.

The decision follows an in-depth investigation launched in October 2014 by the Commission to examine whether the decision by Luxembourg's tax authorities with regard to the corporate income tax to be paid by Amazon in Luxembourg complied with the EU state aid rules.

The Commission's decision, issued on October 4, notes that the tax ruling enabled Amazon to shift the vast majority of its profits from an Amazon group company that is subject to tax in Luxembourg (Amazon EU) to a company, which is not subject to tax (Amazon Europe Holding Technologies). In particular, the tax ruling endorsed the payment of a royalty from Amazon EU to Amazon Europe Holding Technologies, which significantly reduced Amazon EU's taxable profits.

The Commission found that the tax ruling endorsed an unjustified method to calculate Amazon's taxable profits in Luxembourg. In particular, the level of the royalty payments, endorsed by the tax ruling, was inflated and did not reflect economic reality. On this basis, the Commission concluded that the tax ruling granted a selective economic advantage to Amazon by allowing the group to pay less tax than other companies subject to the same national tax rules. In fact, the ruling enabled Amazon to avoid taxation on three quarters of the profits it made from all Amazon sales in the EU.

The Commission's October 4 decision sets out the methodology to calculate the value of the competitive advantage granted to Amazon –that is, the difference between what the company paid in taxes and what it would have been liable to pay without the tax ruling. On the basis of available information, this is estimated to be around EUR250m, plus interest, the Commission said. The tax authorities of Luxembourg must now determine the precise amount of unpaid tax in Luxembourg, on the basis of the methodology established in the decision.

Commissioner Margrethe Vestager commented: "Luxembourg gave illegal tax benefits to Amazon. As a result, almost three quarters of Amazon's profits were not taxed. In other words, Amazon was allowed to pay four times less tax than other local companies subject to the same national tax rules. This is illegal under EU state aid rules. Member states cannot give selective tax benefits to multinational groups that are not available to others."


 

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